Proschaka's Six Stages

From the field of addiction counseling, James Prochaska researched and developed a theory of readiness for change in people that is pretty well defined. The six stages are also a useful exercise to consider when thinking about behavior design in your product.

 

Stage 1: Pre-Contemplation

During this stage people are unaware for their need to change. Using assessment data that is specific to that user can help raise the awareness for change.

Stage 2: Contemplation

People are considering making a change when in this stage, but are often unsure how to proceed. They often struggle with whether making a change or taking action is worth it and will get stuck weighing the pros and cons of making a change.

Stage 3: Preparation

A person moves to gathering information, and lining up resources, or gathering options in order to make a change. This stage is a pivotal transition from thinking (Stage 2) to doing (stage 4). This is where a product or service can play a pivotal role in facilitating behavior change in individuals.

Stage 4: Action

This stage is where a person is actually trying new things and taking action.

Stage 5: Maintenance

Persisting with an action long enough for it to become a habit or routine is the hallmark of this stage. making minor modifications or tuneups to a persons plan based on their environment is key.

Stage 6: Termination

This term is used to simply signify that the person no longer needs any kind of programatic system to help facilitate change because key actions have successfully become a natural part of their lifestyle.

These six stages are not always linear and a person could be in multiple stages at the same time while addressing multiple behaviors. 


Williams, Patrick, and Diane Susan. Menendez. Becoming a Professional Life Coach: Lessons from the Institute for Life Coach Training. 2nd ed. New York: W.W. Norton, 2007. 76-79. Print.

Market Problems and Behavior Design

When it comes to building a successful product there are two pillars that cannot be left out; market problems and behavior design. You must understand your markets and their problems and you must design a solution that triggers actions and behaviors that your market is ready to take. 

If you focus on trying to get a market to use your product and they are not motivated nor have the ability to use your solution, your product will fail.  Your product doesn't have to be perfect. It just has to help your market solve their problem at the very moment they need a solution.